Monday, July 29, 2013

Torture: Kratman was right, if horrific

Kudos to Tom Kratman for being right about the (horrific) effectiveness of torture, and to the CIA for being smarter than people give them credit for. Torture done properly is effective; otherwise there wouldn't be a moral dilemma. (This is true whether or not waterboarding constitutes torture--any negative conditioning that can be performed with waterboarding would work as well or better with more horrific punishments.)

'Hayden acknowledged that prisoners might say anything to stop their suffering. (Like the other panelists, he insisted EITs weren't torture.) That's why "we never asked anybody anything we didn't know the answer to, while they were undergoing the enhanced interrogation techniques. The techniques were not designed to elicit truth in the moment." Instead, EITs were used in a controlled setting, in which interrogators knew the answers and could be sure they were inflicting misery only when the prisoner said something false. The point was to create an illusion of godlike omniscience and omnipotence so that the prisoner would infer, falsely, that his captors always knew when he was lying or withholding information.'

Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency; and array thyself with glory and beauty.
Cast abroad the rage of thy wrath: and behold every one that is proud, and abase him.
Look on every one that is proud, and bring him low; and tread down the wicked in their place.
Hide them in the dust together; and bind their faces in secret.
Then will I also confess unto thee that thine own right hand can save thee.

I could not love thee, dear, so much,
Loved I not Honor more.

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